TCR_Public/001027.MBX              T R O U B L E D   C O M P A N Y   R E P O R T E R

                 Friday, October 27, 2000, Vol. 4, No. 211
  
                                Headlines

1824 WEEKS HOLDING: Case Summary and 11 Largest Unsecured Creditors
ALLIED DIGITAL: Case Summary and 42 Largest Unsecured Creditors
ALLIED DIGITAL: Video and Audio Duplicator and Affiliates Files Chapter 11
ARKOOSH PRODUCE: Case Summary and 11 Largest Unsecured Creditors
ARMSTRONG WORLD: Moody's Downgrades Ratings & Places Them Under Review

BUILDING MATERIALS: Moody's Places Debt Ratings Under Review For Downgrade
CANFIBRE GROUP: Parent Company Makes Statement About Subsidiary's Filing
CINCINNATI CORDAGE: Champion Industries Bid Accepted By Paper Manufacturer
CORRECTIONS CORP.: Announces Issue of Additional Shares for Series B Stock
CROWN CRAFTS: Plans to Lay-Off 250 Workers on Dec. 29, 2000

DIMON, INC.: Moody's Downgrades Senior Ratings to Ba3 & Says Outlook Poor
EDWARDS THEATRES: Gets Court Approval To Use Cash Proceeds Until Nov. 13
FRUIT OF THE LOOM: Obtains Extension of Exclusive Period through Year-End
GRAND UNION: Grocery Chain Asks Judge Winfield for Nov. 16 Auction Date
HARNISCHFEGER INDUSTRIES:

INTERPOOL INC: Moody's Cuts Ratings Following Transamerica Finance Purchase
MICROBEST, INC.: Files Motion in Florida Court to Dismiss Chapter 11 Case
NU-KOTE HOLDING: Tennessee Court Confirms Debtors' Chapter 11 Plan
ORBCOMM GLOBAL: Signs Komatsu Ltd. Up as its Newest Customer
OWENS CORNING: Court Okays Payment of Import Fees & Possessory Liens

PACIFICARE HEALTH: President Robert O'Leary Resigns Effective Immediately
SAFETY-KLEEN: Seeks to Pay Superfund Obligations through November 30
SERVICE MERCHANDISE: Winding-Up Non-Debtor Insurance Subsidiary
SILVER CINEMAS: Fed Up, Committee Moves for Conversion or Dismissal
TOKHEIM CORPORATION: Chapter 11 Plan Declared Effective on October 20

TRI VALLEY: Several Prospective Buyers for Bankrupt Tomato Grower
VENCOR, INC: Delaware Court Extends DIP Financing Until January 31, 2000
WASTE MANAGEMENT: Announces Investment Conferences for Fourth Quarter

* BOOK REVIEW: The Failure of the Franklin National Bank:
                Challenge to the International Banking System

                                *********

1824 WEEKS HOLDING: Case Summary and 11 Largest Unsecured Creditors
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Debtor: 1824 Weeks Holding Corp.
         c/o Levites Realty Management
         341 East 149th Street
         Bronx, New York 10451

Type of Business: Real Estate

Chapter 11 Petition Date: October 25, 2000

Court: Southern District of New York

Bankruptcy Case No.: 15005

Judge: Prudence Carter Beatty

Debtor's Counsel: A. Mitchell Greene, Esq.
                   Robinson Brog Leinwand Greene et al.
                   1345 Avenue of the Americas New York
                   New York 1010
                   (212) 586-4050

Total Assets: $ 1,386,000
Total Debts : $ 433,318

11 Largest Unsecured Creditors:

NYC Dept. of Environmental Protection
  NYC Water Board                                            $ 92,558

New York City Dept. of Finance                              $ 53,339

Baron Associates                                            $ 19,709

Nicholas Chimenti                                            $ 9,037

Maizes and Maizes                                            $ 5,000

Ligia Velez                                                  $ 4,783

Bruce Kashkin, CPA                                           $ 2,500

Rakaj Aleks                                                  $ 1,986

New York Boiler Repair Group                                 $ 1,134

Peter Vuksanaj                                                 $ 572

Ligia Velez                                                    $ 138


ALLIED DIGITAL: Case Summary and 42 Largest Unsecured Creditors
---------------------------------------------------------------
Debtor: Allied Digital Technologies Corporation
         15 Gilpin Avenue
         Hauppauge, NY 11788

Affiliates: Allied Digital, Inc.
             HRM Holdings Corporation
             Vaughn Communications, Inc.
             HMG Digital Technologies Corporation

Chapter 11 Petition Date: October 25, 2000

Court: District of Delaware

Bankruptcy Case No.: 00-04020

Debtor's Counsel: William H. Sudell, Jr., Esq.
                   Derek C. Abbott, Esq.
                   Gregory W. Werkheiser, Esq.
                   Morris, Nichols, Arsht & Tunnell
                   1201 North Market Street
                   P.O. Box 1347
                   Wilmington, Delaware 19899-1347
                   (302) 658-9200

                   Joel H. Levitin, Esq.
                   Dechert, Price & Rhodes
                   30 Rockefeller Plaza
                   New York, NY 10112
                   (212) 698-3500

Total Assets: $ 1 Million above
Total Debts : $ 100 Million above

30 Largest Unsecured Creditors:

Fleet Bank
c/o Tina Brozman, Esq.               Projected                 $ 90,000,000
Bingham Dana LLP                     Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank         together w/
New York, NY 10022                   Loans                   other lenders)

Provident Capital Corp.
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

ING Capital Advisors
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Creditanstalt Corporate
  Finance, Inc.
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Deutsche Financial
  Services Corp.
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

US Bank National
  Association
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Societe Generale
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Greater Bay Bank
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Wachovia Bank
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Pilgrim America
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

IBJ Whitehall
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Sovereign Bank
Tina Brozman                        Projected                 $ 90,000,000
c/o Bingham Dana LLP                 Undersecured            (in aggregate,
399 Park Avenue                      Portion of Bank          together w/
NY, NY 10022                         Loans                   other lenders)

Fleet Corporate Finance Inc.
Robert Ziemer
1185 Avenue of the
  Americas
Mailstop: NYNYS16F
New York, NY 10036
(212) 819-6111
Fax:(212) 819-6244                  Financing loan            $ 10,021,350

Sachan Media America, Inc.
P.O. Box 51178
Los Angeles, CA 90051-5478          Trade Debt                 $ 2,582,179

Infiniti Media Inc.
Katherine Wu
7251 Ethel Avenue
North Hollywood, CA 91605
(818) 764-8818
Fax:(818) 764-9063                  Trade Debt                 $ 1,697,576

Viva Magnetics Canada Ltd.
Jim Ware
7167 Progress Way
Delta, British
Columbia, Canada CA V4G 1K8
(843) 322-0002
Fax:(843) 322-0003                  Trade Debt                 $ 1,148,977

Sony Music Entertainment
Mike Gamble
550 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022  
(770) 836-2467
Fax:(770) 836-2189                  Trade Debt                 $ 1,125,614

Titron Media HK
Room 1109-11
Shun Tak Center
200 Connaught Road
Central Hong Kong                   Trade Debt                   $ 907,476

Disc Graphics Inc.
Traci Baumann
P.O. Box 18031
Hauppauge, NY 11788
(516) 300-1272
Fax:(516) 582-9428                  Trade Debt                   $ 856,444

3M Company
Rich Ligthsey
P.O. Box 601095
Charlotte, NC 28260-1095
(612) 737-1197
Fax:(612) 733-7899                  Trade Debt                   $ 850,677

GE Plastics
Dave Devito
Lockbox Dept. # 640389
Pittsburgh National Bank
960 Fort Duquesne Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(413) 448-5719
(704) 948-4952                      Trade Debt                   $ 771,791

John K. Mangini
50 Pheasant Run
Old Tappan, NJ 07675
(201) 750-1423                      Severance Payment            $ 662,879

U.S. Phillips Corporation
Edward Blocker
580 White Plains Road
Tarrytown, NY 10591-5190
(914) 332-0222
Fax:(914) 332-0615                  Trade Debt                   $ 484,294

Discovision
P.O. Box 19616
Irvine, CA 92623
(949) 660-5000
Fax:(949) 660-1801                  Trade Debt                   $ 446,675

Alpha Media Packaging
Tammy Novack
P.O. Box 711489
Cincinnati, OH 45271-1489
(330) 490-2000 Ext. 243
Fax:(330) 490-2012                  Trade Debt                   $ 423,495

Shape Inc.
Norma Grenier
135 So. Lasalle Street
  Dept. # 2797
Chicago, IL 60674-2797
(207) 985-4972
Fax:(207) 985-2105                  Trade Debt                   $ 302,760

JD Edwards
Tom Gabriele
World Solutions Inc.
  Department 770
Denver, CO 80271
(303) 334-4000
Fax:(303) 334-4678                  Trade Debt                   $ 273,840

Great Lakes Lithograph
4005 Clark Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44109
(216) 651-1500
Fax:(216) 651-8311                  Trade Debt                   $ 261,102

Spiro-Wallach/Unisource
Tony Valente
21 Banfi Plaza
Farmingdale, NY 11735
(516) 501-3200
Fax:(516) 501-5333                  Trade Debt                   $ 261,046

Hero Kingdom Ltd.                   Trade Debt                   $ 245,565

Gordon Cross                        Trade Debt                   $ 236,880

Discovision Associates              Trade Debt                   $ 230,528

Emtec Pro Media Inc.                Trade Debt                   $ 172,232

Robert Harmon                       Non-Compete Payment          $ 166,666

Jeffrey Johnson                     Non-compete Payment          $ 166,666

Printed Specialties, Inc.           Trade Debt                   $ 145,102

PolyMatrix Inc.                     Trade Debt                   $ 138,311

United Parcel Service/03            Trade Debt                   $ 135,889

Steag Hamatech Inc.                 Trade Debt                   $ 129,427

LIPA                                Trade Debt                   $ 126,040

Alan Gill                           Trade Debt                   $ 118,867

Ernst Wong                          Non-Compete Payment          $ 118,867


ALLIED DIGITAL: Video and Audio Duplicator and Affiliates Files Chapter 11
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dow Jones reports on Allied Digital Technologies Corp. and four affiliates
filing for Chapter 11 in U.S.B.C. in Wilmington, Del. The company posted
assets ranging from $1 million to $50 million and debts of over $100
million. The four affiliates that filed together with ADTC are Allied
Digital Inc., HRM Holdings Corp., Vaughn Communications Inc., and HMG
Digital Technologies Corp. ADTC has hired the following firms to aid them
on their bankruptcy reorganization:

     Deloitte Consulting LLC   -  auditor
     Deloitte & Touche LLP     -  accountant
     Gordian Group LP          -  financial adviser
     KPMG LLP                  -  special auditor and tax consultant

According to Dow Jones, Allied Digital Technologies is an independent
provider of duplication and replication services of video, audio and CD-ROM
products for businesses such as the entertainment industry. It provides a
complete line of CD, DVD video and audio formats. As of September, the
company employed 1,750 people.


ARKOOSH PRODUCE: Case Summary and 11 Largest Unsecured Creditors
----------------------------------------------------------------
Debtor: Arkoosh Produce, Inc.
         1045 Agrilane
         Gooding ID 83330

Chapter 11 Petition Date: October 24, 2000

Court: District of Idaho

Bankruptcy Case No.: 00-41817

Judge: Jim D. Pappas

Debtor's Counsel: William Thomas Thurman, Esq.
                   McKay, Burton, Thurman
                   10 East South Temple St., #600
                   Salt Lake City, UT 84133
                   (801) 521-4135

Total Assets: $ 3,622,577
Total Debts : $ 7,956,701

11 Largest Unsecured Creditors:

Kober Farms
Western Bank
559 Woodhad Drive
Twin Falls, ID 83301                  Trade Debt              $ 262,679

Friedman Bag Company                  Trade                   $ 247,214

Internal Revenue Service              Taxes                   $ 209,566

Baker Farms, Inc.                     Trade                   $ 203,425

Karl Joslin                           Trade Debt              $ 126,072

Jensen Carlson Farms                                          $ 124,914

Scott Farms                           Trade                    $ 97,737

Ron Pierce                            Trade                    $ 89,447

D&L Hansen, Inc.                      Trade                    $ 87,736

Mark & Ryan Thiel                     Trade                    $ 81,634

Vemile Staker                         Trade                    $ 62,067


ARMSTRONG WORLD: Moody's Downgrades Ratings & Places Them Under Review
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Moody's Investors Service downgraded the ratings of Armstrong World
Industries Inc. (senior to Baa3) and placed the ratings under review for
further possible downgrade. The rating action is prompted by several
factors including concerns regarding a reduction in committed credit
facilities, potential deterioration in the external business environment
and continued uncertainty regarding the course of asbestos litigation. In
combination, these factors could negatively affect the company's ability to
achieve targeted debt reduction.

Ratings downgraded and placed under review for further downgrade are:

    Armstrong World Industries, Inc.

     a) senior unsecured debentures, medium-term notes and revolving
          credit facility to Baa3 from Baa1;

     b) shelf registration for senior unsecured debt to (P)Baa3 from  
          (P)Baa1;

     c) commercial paper rating to Prime-3 from Prime-1.

Yesterday, Armstrong disclosed that upon the expiration of a 364-day credit
facility, it had not renewed the expiring facility. Given current
commercial paper outstandings of approximately $350 million, the company
currently has available credit of approximately $100 million on its $450
million long-term facility expiring in 2003. While Armstrong will continue
efforts to establish additional liquidity sources, the near-term
availability of credit is constrained. In addition, while operating results
year-to-date have been positive, potential weakness in markets, combined
with raw material cost pressures, suggests that prospects for future cash
flow generation have weakened to the extent that, absent non-recurring
items such as asset sales, projected debt reduction targets will be more
difficult to achieve. Finally, the environment regarding asbestos
litigation remains highly uncertain. Armstrong increased its reserve for
asbestos liability by $236 million in the second quarter. In the wake of
the Owens Corning bankruptcy, the asbestos litigation environment is
evolving and highly uncertain. The review is focusing on Armstrong's
vulnerability to additional asbestos-related charges and further erosion in
its operating environment. Given the potentially significant liability that
could result from this litigation, and the extended time frame that will
likely be necessary to achieve ultimate resolution of all future liability,
Armstrong's rating could be subject to multiple-notch reductions.

Armstrong World Industries, headquartered in Lancaster, PA, had revenues of
$3.4 billion in 1999.


BUILDING MATERIALS: Moody's Places Debt Ratings Under Review For Downgrade
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Moody's Investors Service has placed the debt ratings of Building Materials
Corporation of America, under review for downgrade following comments by
the company's parent GAF Corporation.

The following ratings are under review:

    (1) The Ba3 senior implied rating

    (2) The Ba3 rating on the 10.50% of $35 million senior notes, due 2002

    (3) The Ba3 rating on the 7.75% of $150 million senior notes, due 2005

    (4) The Ba3 rating on the 8.63% of $100 million senior notes, due 2006

    (5) The Ba3 rating on the 8.00% of $100 million senior notes, due 2007

    (6) The Ba3 rating on the 8.00% of $155 million senior notes, due 2008

    (7) The Ba3 issuer rating

GAF has advised BMCA that the filing by Owens Corning for protection from
creditors under the federal bankruptcy laws could increase, by a
substantial factor, the financial burden on the remaining asbestos
defendants in the tort system, including GAF, and thus is a significant
adverse event affecting GAF's asbestos-related litigation. As part of its
review, Moody's will consider the company's exposure and financial
flexibility in light of its parents revised expectations for asbestos
litigation claims.

Building Materials Corporation of America, headquartered in Wayne, New
Jersey, which operates under the name of GAF Materials Corporation, is a
subsidiary of GAF Corporation, and is a leading national manufacture of
steep slope and low slope roofing products and specialty building products.


CANFIBRE GROUP: Parent Company Makes Statement About Subsidiary's Filing
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The CanFibre Group Ltd. (CDNX:YCF.) reports that its wholly owned
subsidiary, CanFibre of Riverside, Inc. has voluntarily filed for
reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code.

This action is a result of failure of the facility to be completed on a
timely basis which resulted in a liquidity crisis. The Company will return
to operation following the filing.

No such filing was made for CanFibre's second MDF facility, CanFibre of
Lackawanna, LLC. Construction of CanFibre of Lackawanna's MDF facility is
expected to be completed in November 2000 with a 6 month start-up period
expected to commence soon thereafter.

The filing, made in Wilmington, Delaware, will enable CanFibre Riverside to
focus on operating its business and serving its customers, while it
develops a plan of reorganization that will allow completion of the
facility and provide a suitable capital structure for long-term growth.

CanFibre also announced that it has obtained an agreement from certain of
its lenders to release, upon bankruptcy court approval, the necessary funds
to meet CanFibre Riverside's future cash needs and fulfill obligations
associated with operating its business on an ongoing basis. Employees will
continue to be paid in the normal manner and their health benefits will not
be disrupted.

CanFibre anticipates that the combination of cash on hand, existing cash
flow from inventory sales, and the new financing commitment, will provide
CanFibre Riverside sufficient liquidity to meet all future financial
obligations to employees, suppliers and vendors.


CINCINNATI CORDAGE: Champion Industries Bid Accepted By Paper Manufacturer
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Champion Industries, Inc. announced that its bid to purchase the
Huntington, West Virginia paper distribution division of The Cincinnati
Cordage Paper Company was accepted by Cordage at an auction held by the
U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Ohio, in Cincinnati,
Ohio on October 23, 2000. The accepted bid covers the building, leased real
property, fixed assets, receivables and inventory of the Huntington Cordage
operation. The final purchase price will be determined at closing, based on
various adjustments calculated as of closing. Subject to entry of a final
order of the Bankruptcy Court, closing is scheduled for Nov. 6, 2000. (New
Generation Research, Inc. 25-Oct-00)


CORRECTIONS CORP.: Announces Issue of Additional Shares for Series B Stock
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corrections Corporation of America (formerly Prison Realty Trust, Inc.)
(NYSE: CXW) announced that it will issue approximately 1,589,112 additional
shares of its Series B Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock on Monday,
November 13, 2000, to its common stockholders of record on Monday, November
6, 2000, in connection with the company's election to be taxed and qualify
as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, with respect to its 1999
taxable year. As a result of this distribution, the company's common
stockholders will be entitled to receive 1 share of Series B Preferred
Stock, having a stated value of $24.46 per share, for every 100 shares of
common stock held by them on the record date. Cash will be paid in lieu of
issuing fractional shares of Series B Preferred Stock. The company is
distributing the shares of Series B Preferred Stock in order to satisfy its
remaining distribution requirements in connection with its election to be
taxed and qualify as a REIT with respect to its 1999 taxable year. The
company previously issued 5,927,805 shares of Series B Preferred Stock on
September 22, 2000 in connection with its 1999 REIT distribution
requirements, but because the fair market value of the shares issued in the
initial distribution, as discussed below, was not sufficient to satisfy the
company's 1999 distribution requirements, the company is required to make
the additional distribution at this time.

Terms of the Series B Preferred Stock

Like the shares of Series B Preferred Stock previously issued by the
company, the additional shares of Series B Preferred Stock to be issued
will provide for dividends payable in additional shares of Series B
Preferred Stock at a rate of 12% per year for the first three years
following the issuance of the shares and cash dividends at a rate of 12%
per year thereafter, payable for the period from issuance through December
31, 2000 and quarterly thereafter in arrears. The additional shares of the
Series B Preferred Stock will be callable by the company, at a price per
share equal to the stated value of $24.46, plus any accrued dividends, at
any time after six months following the later of (i) November 13, 2003 or
(ii) the 91st day following the redemption of the company's $100.0 million
12% senior notes, due 2006. The additional shares of Series B Preferred
Stock will be convertible into shares of the company's common stock only
from Thursday, December 7, 2000 to Wednesday, December 20, 2000, at a
conversion price based on the average closing price of CCA's common stock
on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") during the period beginning on
Wednesday, November 22, 2000 and ending on Wednesday, December 6, 2000
(i.e., the 10 trading days prior to the first day of the conversion
period), provided, however that the conversion price used to determine the
number of shares of CCA's common stock issuable upon conversion of the
Series B Preferred Stock shall not be less than $1.00. The number of shares
of common stock that will be issuable upon the conversion of each share of
Series B Preferred Stock will be calculated by dividing the stated price
($24.46) plus accrued and unpaid dividends as of the date of conversion of
each share of Series B Preferred Stock by the conversion price established
for the conversion period.

The company has applied to list the additional shares of Series B Preferred
Stock, and the shares of the company's common stock into which the Series B
Preferred Stock is convertible, on the NYSE, pending official notice of
issuance. The previously issued shares of Series B Preferred Stock are
currently listed on the NYSE under the symbol "CXW PrB".

Tax Consequences and Fair Market Value of Distributions

The distribution of the additional shares of Series B Preferred Stock will
generally be treated as a taxable dividend, and thus stockholders receiving
such shares will recognize ordinary income equal to the fair market value
of the shares received. Future dividends on the additional shares Series B
Preferred Stock, whether paid in stock or cash, also will generally be
taxable as ordinary income.

The company has determined the fair market value of the shares of Series B
Preferred Stock initially distributed by the company on September 22, 2000
to be $18.00 per share. Accordingly, the company's common stockholders who
received Series B Preferred Stock in the initial distribution generally
will be required to include as ordinary income on their tax returns $18.00
for each share of Series B Preferred Stock received, which amount will
constitute the stockholders' basis in such shares. The fair market value of
the additional shares of Series B Preferred Stock to be distributed on
November 13, 2000 will be determined following the distribution of such
shares.

Conversion of Shares of Previously Issued Series B Preferred Stock During
Initial Conversion Period

The shares of Series B Preferred Stock previously issued by the company on
September 22, 2000 were convertible during an initial conversion period,
which began on Monday, October 2, 2000 and ended on Friday, October 13,
2000. The conversion price for the initial conversion period was
established at $1.4813, thereby resulting in each share of Series B
Preferred Stock being convertible into approximately 16.6 shares of the
company's common stock during the initial conversion period (calculated by
dividing the stated price ($24.46) plus accrued and unpaid dividends as of
the date of conversion of each share of Series B Preferred Stock by the
conversion price ($1.4813)). During the initial conversion period,
approximately 1,302,486 shares of the Series B Preferred Stock were
converted, resulting in the issuance of approximately 21,621,267 shares of
the company's common stock.

The shares of Series B Preferred Stock previously issued by the company
will also be convertible during the period beginning on Thursday, December
7, 2000 and ending on Wednesday, December 20, 2000. The conversion price
for this subsequent conversion period will be set based upon the average
closing price of the company's common stock on the NYSE from Wednesday,
November 22, 2000 to Wednesday, December 6, 2000, subject to the $1.00
floor. The number of shares of common stock that will be issuable upon the
conversion of each share of Series B Preferred Stock during the period will
be calculated by dividing the stated price ($24.46) plus accrued and unpaid
dividends as of the date of conversion of each share of Series B Preferred
Stock by the conversion price established for the conversion period.

CCA and its affiliated companies are the nation's largest provider of
detention and corrections services to governmental agencies. The company is
the industry leader in private sector corrections with approximately 68,000
beds in 75 facilities under contract or under development and ownership of
45 facilities in the United States, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom.
CCA's full range of services includes design, construction, ownership,
renovation and management of new or existing jails and prisons, as well as
long distance inmate transportation services.

CCA has recently completed a series of previously announced restructuring
transactions which included, among other things, the merger of the company
with its primary tenant. In connection with the merger, the company,
formerly known as Prison Realty Trust, Inc., changed its name to
Corrections Corporation of America.


CROWN CRAFTS: Plans to Lay-Off 250 Workers on Dec. 29, 2000
-----------------------------------------------------------
Crown Crafts, Inc. (NYSE: CRW), gave notice to effected employees that
there will be a layoff at its Timberlake (Roxboro), North Carolina facility
on December 29, 2000. Approximately 250 of the current 392 employees are
expected to lose their jobs.

Crown Crafts' CEO Michael Bernstein, who personally made the announcement
at Roxboro explained, "In order to be competitive in the home furnishings
industry, we must focus our resources in those areas that add the most
value for our customers.  After an extensive review, we concluded that we
should shift our strategy to be a marketing and distribution business and
to outsource most manufacturing.  We deeply regret the impact that this has
on our employees and the community, but we must face the reality of
competitive forces in the international economy."

Crown Crafts, Inc., headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, designs,
manufactures, and markets a broad line of home textile furnishings and
accessories. The Company's three major product groups are bedroom products,
throws and decorative home accessories, and infant and juvenile products.


DIMON, INC.: Moody's Downgrades Senior Ratings to Ba3 & Says Outlook Poor
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Moody's Investors Service downgraded to Ba3 the senior implied rating of
Dimon Incorporated, the rating of the $125 million 8 7/8% senior notes due
2006 and the rating of the $250 million revolving credit facility due 2002.
The issuer rating is downgraded to B1. The rating action reflects the
expected weak free cash flow generation of the company relative to its
debt, prospects for low tobacco consumption growth over the medium term,
and expected pressure on Dimon's operating margins due to the bargaining
power of its clients. The rating outlook is negative. Significant reduction
in cash flow available for debt repayment could put pressure on the
ratings. This concludes the rating review for possible downgrade initiated
on June 20, 2000.

Ratings downgraded:

    a) senior implied, to Ba3

    b) $125 million 8 7/8% senior notes due 2006, to Ba3

    c) $250 million revolving credit facility due 2002, to Ba3

    d) issuer rating, to B1

Following price increases on packs of cigarettes tied to the implementation
of the Master Settlement Agreement in 1998 between cigarette companies and
the states, the volume of cigarettes sold and the volume of tobacco
purchased by cigarette companies from suppliers such as Dimon have dropped
significantly in a key market for cigarette companies: the US. In 1999,
cigarette shipments dropped 9%; Moody's expects that this decline will
continue -- though not always as steeply -- over the long term, as
potential new excise taxes and regulations lead to further decrease in
cigarette use. However, it is outside of the US that a majority of the
processed tobacco sold by Dimon is ultimately consumed as cigarettes.
Moody's believes that outside of the US, overall cigarette consumption
trends should be positive over the long term, driven mainly by favorable
demographics. Overall, overall demand for tobacco sold by Dimon should be
only slightly positive.

Moody's expects that Dimon's operating margins will continue to be under
pressure as a result of the strong bargaining power of its clients. Dimon's
client concentration is high, with the company's top three clients
representing 35% of its sales. The loss of one client could have a
significant impact on the company's results. Still, while some cigarette
companies are experimenting with direct procurement of US-grown tobacco,
Moody's believes that most of the value added by Dimon's activity lies in
its procurement networks and tobacco-processing expertise, and that these
cannot be easily replicated. Also, while procurement and processing are
integrated within the British American Tobacco cigarette company, the trend
in the last years has been for cigarette companies to divest and
subcontract these activities. Leaf tobacco processing being asset-
intensive, a move back into these activities would depress these companies'
return on assets.

Over the last two years, Dimon's operating results have been negatively
impacted by volume drops tied to the implementation of the Master
Settlement Agreement and to economic crises in certain emerging markets.
Operating incomes achieved in fiscal year 1999 and 2000 ($39 million and
$81 million, respectively) are significantly lower than those achieved in
prior years ($167 million in FY1997, $140 million in FY1998). This drop in
performance has led the company to engage in a restructuring of its
manufacturing activity. The company has also significantly reduced its
working capital, by a cumulative net amount of $280 million over the last
two fiscal years. This has been achieved largely by reducing inventory not
backed by customer orders, or "uncommitted inventory". The substantial free
cash flow generated by Dimon thanks to this working capital improvement has
allowed it to decrease its debt by a cumulative net amount of $412 million
over the last two fiscal years.

However, Moody's expects that Dimon's free cash flow levels will be
significantly reduced over the medium term, as further large reductions in
working capital are unlikely and operating income could continue to be
constrained by the strong bargaining power of cigarette companies. In view
of the still high level of debt ( $678 million at the end of fiscal year
2000), Dimon's expected low levels of free cash flow give it only a reduced
ability to decrease its debt over the medium term.

In the financing of its activity, Dimon makes significant reliance on
seasonal lines, often provided by banks located in the countries in which
it operates. Their uncommited nature weakens the liquidity profile of the
company.

DIMON Incorporated is the world's second largest dealer of leaf tobacco
with operations in more than 30 countries.


EDWARDS THEATRES: Gets Court Approval To Use Cash Proceeds Until Nov. 13
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A bankruptcy court has entered an agreed upon final order authorizing
Edwards Theatres Circuit Inc. to use certain of its cash that is subject to
the liens of Bank of America N.A., which serves as agent for some of the
theatres' secured lenders. In an order entered last week, the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court in Santa Ana, Calif., authorized the Newport Beach,
Calif.-based theatre operator to use the post-petition cash proceeds of its
accounts receivable and inventory through Nov. 13. The proceeds, which are
subject to the bank's liens, is considered cash collateral under the
Bankruptcy Code and isn't available for use by the theatre without the
court's or bank's consent.  (ABI 25-Oct-00)


FRUIT OF THE LOOM: Obtains Extension of Exclusive Period through Year-End
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fruit of the Loom sought and obtained a second extension of its exclusive
periods during which to file a plan of reorganization and solicit
acceptances.   FTL asked Judge Walsh for an extension through December 31,
2000 to file a plan of reorganization and until March 1, 2001, to solicit
creditors' acceptances of its plan.

Fruit of the Loom gave the Court many reasons to support its request. The
apparel-manufacturing environment is very competitive. The process of
developing a business plan and a reorganization plan is arduous and time
consuming given the size and complexity of its estate. Fruit of the Loom
asserts that matters of vital importance continue to distract management.

For example, Fruit of the Loom received more than 12,000 claims aggregating
over $54 billion (including duplicate claims). Fruit of the Loom was party
to more than 1,300 executory contracts and expired leases at the petition
date. There was a 2,000-employee workforce reduction. Litigation with
former chief executive officer, William Farley, continues.

Fruit of the Loom maintains it cannot file a meaningful and agreeable plan
of reorganization within the time given. A plan standing a chance of
approval cannot be finalized and formulated by the end of the year. All
progress will evaporate if the exclusivity period is not extended.

FTL's main focus is the stabilization of business along with the
maintenance and repair of trade support and customer loyalty. To stabilize
operations, Fruit of the Loom needs three things:

    (a) an adequate supply of merchandise;

    (b) customers willing to place orders on favorable economic terms; and

    (c) employees dedicated to and comfortable with Fruit of the Loom.

Debtor incurred operating losses from continuing operations of over
$400,000,000 during fiscal year 1999. It is not realistic to expect a
financial institution to provide exit financing to Fruit of the Loom in the
absence of a turnaround. The time left is insufficient to establish
credibility with potential lenders.

Fruit of the Loom acknowledges that some requests for extension of the
exclusive period are used as bargaining leverage over creditor
constituencies.

However, the request before the Court is not a negotiation tactic but an
indication that the situation is not ripe for formulation and confirmation
of a viable reorganization plan. (Fruit of the Loom Bankruptcy News, Issue
No. 15; Bankruptcy Creditors' Service, Inc., 609/392-0900)


GRAND UNION: Grocery Chain Asks Judge Winfield for Nov. 16 Auction Date
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Union, the troubled Northeast supermarket chain, Tribune Business
News reports, will go to court on Oct. 30 to ask Judge Novalyn Winfield to
approve a Nov. 16 auction at the offices of its New York law firm, Weil,
Gotshal & Manges.  The chain wants to sell assets but that "does not mean
we are obligated to go forward if their are no acceptable bids," WG&M
attorney Adam Rogoff, Esq., said.  "We reserve the right to withdraw any or
all assets from auction.  We are hopeful we will get a number of acceptable
bids. We are talking to a number of interested parties."


HARNISCHFEGER INDUSTRIES: Joint Plan & Disclosure Statement Filed Yesterday
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Harnischfeger Industries, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: HRZIQ) filed a Joint
Plan of Reorganization and Disclosure Statement yesterday in its Chapter 11
proceeding.  The Plan, which covers HII and 57 of its domestic
subsidiaries, reflects a consensual arrangement with both the official HII
and Beloit creditors committees appointed in the proceeding.

If confirmed, the Plan generally will provide for full payment to the
creditors of Joy, P&H and most of their subsidiaries and the payment of
unsecured creditors of HII with new common stock of HII. Beloit creditors
would receive the net proceeds from the liquidation of Beloit Corporation.
No distribution to HII's current shareholders is anticipated by the Plan
and all of the existing HII shares will be canceled.

The Plan allows HII, Joy and P&H to emerge from Chapter 11 as a global
supplier of equipment and services to the surface and underground mining
business. HII expects to emerge with a favorable capital structure that
will allow it the flexibility to respond to and take advantage of the
changing dynamics of its industry.

Yesterday's filing is one of the last steps HII must take to emerge from
Bankruptcy. The Disclosure Statement is subject to approval of the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court in the District of Delaware before being mailed to
creditors for solicitation of their approval of the Plan. Because
bankruptcy law prohibits solicitation of an acceptance or rejection of a
Plan until a Disclosure Statement relating to the Plan has been approved by
the Court, this announcement is not intended to be, nor should it be
construed as, a solicitation for a vote on the Plan. HII will emerge from
bankruptcy once the Plan is approved by creditors and confirmed by the
Court. It is expected that HII will emerge in early spring of 2001.


INTERPOOL INC: Moody's Cuts Ratings Following Transamerica Finance Purchase
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Moody's has downgraded the ratings of Interpool, Inc. and its subsidiaries
following its purchase of certain assets of Transamerica Finance
Corporation. Moody's has also assigned a senior implied rating of Ba2 to
Interpool, Inc., and confirmed the rating of Interpool Acquisition L.L.C.'s
bank facility at Ba1. This rating action concludes a rating review that
commenced July 28, 2000. The outlook for all of the ratings is stable.

Moody's believes that the Transamerica Finance acquisition is strategically
sound for Interpool, particularly given the combined entity's sizable
chassis business. Interpool is now the leader in the chassis marketplace
with nearly 50% market share in the US. Additionally, Interpool's overall
asset mix has shifted toward this segment. This shift is beneficial because
Interpool should now command greater market strength and operating leverage
in the chassis business. In Moody's view, the acquisition of Transamerica
Finance's rail trailer and domestic container units is less strategically
compelling.

Moody's concerns regarding the transaction focus on several issues. For
one, Interpool has financed this transaction entirely with secured debt.
This exposes the company to material risks by increasing its leverage and
reducing its financial flexibility. Such conduct is reflective of the
company's governance and risk appetite. Interpool is majority owned by its
management team and, therefore, the balance in pursuing the interests of
shareholders and bondholders is tilted in favor of shareholders, in Moody's
view. Moody's also believes that this culture leads to higher event risk as
it increases the chances that the company may pursue similar opportunities
in the future.

Moody's also commented on the fact that Interpool is faced with several
layers of execution risk. First, Interpool must successfully integrate the
acquired business units. This will likely be a challenge given the
different customer segments that Transamerica Finance targeted.
Additionally, systems integration needs to be carefully managed in order to
avoid disruptions to customer service, and potentially, to cash flows.
Interpool has not faced these issues in the past.

Moody's is also concerned about the company's ability to execute its plan
to sell non-core assets in an effort to reduce its significant debt burden
after the acquisition. The potential market for these types of assets is
quite limited, and the company may find it difficult to achieve a sale at
expected levels or in the time frame that it would like. This could result
in increased risk for bondholders.

Finally, Moody's points out that the transportation leasing business that
the company operates in is cyclical, and Interpool will be further
leveraging itself at what may be a peak in the business cycle. Moody's
noted that Interpool attempts to mitigate this risk by entering into long -
term leases on a significant portion of its fleet. Moody's also noted that
the chassis leasing business, in its current form, has never experienced a
significant economic downturn. Given the equipment's long economically
useful life, it may take some time to rebalance supply and demand, thus
exposing Interpool to reduced cash flows. Therefore, Interpool's additional
leverage exposes its bondholders to significant risks.

In its rating analysis of Interpool's various classes of debt, Moody's
strongly considered the position of each obligation in Interpool's capital
structure, and structural enhancements resident in different debt classes.
For example, the Interpool Acquisition L.L.C. facility benefits not only
from a guarantee by Interpool, but also from substantial over-
collateralization. The Interpool secured bank facility benefits from a
security interest in certain assets as well as from the fact that the
obligation resides not only at the holding company, but also at Interpool's
various operating company subsidiaries. Interpool's senior unsecured debt
is at the holding company level and, given the structure of the Interpool
Acquisition L.L.C. facility, is in an equity-like position supporting this
facility's over-collateralization.

The following ratings were downgraded:

    * INTERPOOL, INC. ..TO..FROM

       a) Senior secured bank credit facility to Ba2 from Ba1

       b) Senior unsecured debt to B1 from Ba2

       c) Junior subordinated debt to B3 from B1

    * INTERPOOL CAPITAL TRUST

       a) Preferred stock, guaranteed by Interpool, Inc to "b3" from "b1"

The following rating was confirmed:

    * INTERPOOL ACQUISITION L.L.C.
  
       a) Senior secured bank credit facility..Ba1

The following rating was assigned:

    * INTERPOOL, INC.

       a) Senior Implied..Ba2

Interpool, Inc., based in Princeton, NJ, is a lessor of marine containers
and chassis. As of June 30, 2000 the company reported total assets of $1.5
billion.


MICROBEST, INC.: Files Motion in Florida Court to Dismiss Chapter 11 Case
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Microbest, Inc., (OTC Bulletin Board: MBST) announced that it has filed a
Motion To Dismiss under Chapter 11 in the United States Bankruptcy Court
for the Southern District of Florida.

Microbest filed its voluntary petition for protection under Chapter 11, on
June 1, 2000 to ward off a hostile attempt made to take over the company by
two former insiders aggressively attempting to satisfy a judgment. A signed
resolution has been executed, resolving the dispute, and protection by the
court is no longer necessary.

Michael J. Troup, C.E.O. said, "This action confirms that Microbest's
strategy to use the protection of the bankruptcy court effectively allowed
us to work out the settlement, bringing this matter to closure." Troup went
on to say, "The timing could not be better as the company is poised to
close some of the most significant opportunities in its history both with
private enterprise and government."

Microbest's BioCleansing(R) Product Line provides enormous sales
opportunities and leads the way to compliance with Presidential Executive
Order 13148 mandating that Federal agencies implement Environmentally
Preferable Purchasing focused on the reduction of toxic chemicals,
hazardous substances and pollutants.

"While this aggressive action by our Federal Government mandating
environmental stewardship is overdue, the benefits will begin to evidence
themselves in the short term," said Troup. He further explained, "It is
causing government agencies at all levels and other responsible purchasing
parties to look for alternatives that comply yet provide high quality
results. Biological components are the future in this process, bringing
natural attributes to the function that caustic chemicals cannot provide.
We have clearly been the pioneers in the development of alternative
BioCleansing(R) applications and we are very happy to be here as the market
is finally demanding the technology."


NU-KOTE HOLDING: Tennessee Court Confirms Debtors' Chapter 11 Plan
------------------------------------------------------------------
Nu-kote Holding, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: NKOT) announced that the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court for the Middle District of Tennessee has confirmed the
Company's Plan of Reorganization allowing the Company to emerge from
Chapter 11.

In accordance with the terms of the Plan of Reorganization, the Company
will become an affiliate of Richmont Capital Partners I, LP, a private
merchant banking partnership headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The Company
will continue operating as a going concern with its existing products and
its current management team. "We are very excited about the future of Nu-
kote," said Pat Howard, Chief Executive Officer of Nu-kote International.
"Nu-kote has achieved an incredible accomplishment by not only reorganizing
the Company, but actually growing the business while in Chapter 11."

"Today is especially rewarding for Nu-kote's customers, suppliers and
employees," said Ron Baiocchi, Nu-kote's President and Chief Operating
Officer. "The past two years have been very challenging. Today Nu-kote
emerges from its struggle with renewed stability and strength. Because of
the dedication and loyal support we have received, Nu-kote is now able to
regain its position as a premier provider of aftermarket imaging supplies."

As part of the Plan of Reorganization, the Company's outstanding common
stock will be canceled and will no longer be publicly traded. The holders
of Nu-kote stock will receive no distributions or other consideration under
the terms of the Plan of Reorganization.

Nu-kote is America's favorite aftermarket brand of ink jet, fax, ribbons,
copier and laser printer supplies. With a commitment to quality, value,
innovation and superior service, Nu-kote produces more than 3,000 products
for use in more than 30,000 types of imaging devices. Nu-kote is "The Brand
of Choice for Quality & Value."


ORBCOMM GLOBAL: Signs Komatsu Ltd. Up as its Newest Customer
------------------------------------------------------------
After filing for Chapter 11 on Sept. 15, Satellite Today reports, Orbcomm
Global L.P. has enticed Komatsu Ltd. into joining its customer list.
Komatsu's fleet of construction equipment will be monitored and covered by
Orbcomm worldwide. Komatsu will be using the global satellite network to
pass on vital information about equipment location and engine hours to
Komatsu's rental dealers and service managers. "We are enthusiastic about
the exciting partnership we have developed with Komatsu to provide global
tracking and monitoring capabilities to their growing worldwide network of
construction equipment dealers," said Scott Webster, chairman and CEO of
Orbcomm. "The Orbcomm network remains in full operation, and we are proud
to offer Komatsu's customers quality service and support and the benefits
of low-cost, ubiquitous satellite data communications."


OWENS CORNING: Court Okays Payment of Import Fees & Possessory Liens
--------------------------------------------------------------------
As of October 1, 2000, Owens Corning estimates that $18,000,000 of Imported
Goods had been ordered from foreign suppliers, including the Debtors'
foreign subsidiaries, but had either not yet arrived in the United States
or not yet cleared U.S. Customs. The Debtors estimate that they owe
approximately $3,000,000 of Import Obligations (including customs duties,
ocean freight, air freight, surety bond premiums and customs brokerage
fees, and the like) and ask for permission to pay these prepetition claims.

In the ordinary course of business, the Debtors relate, they purchase
significant quantities of both raw materials and finished goods from
abroad. For example, the Debtors' Composites Division imports glass fiber
materials and products into North America from Composite Division
operations in Brazil and Europe and elsewhere; the Debtors' Insulatioia
Division likewise imports insulation products from Columbia, Mexico and
sometimes China; the Roofing Division imports a large amount of asphalt
from Venezuela; and the Debtors' Insulation and Composite Divisions both
import crude borate ores from Turkey.

Virtually all Imported Goods are subject to customs import duties imposed
by the laws of the United States.' in addition to the Customs Duties, the
Debtors must also pay certain incidental expenses, including, but not
limited to, general order penalties, ocean freight, air freight, trucking
charges, brokerage fees, detention and demurrage fees, surety bond premiums
and deconsolidation charges to effectuate the release of the Imported Goods
to the Debtors. The Import Obligations generally are paid by freight
forwarders who have been engaged by the Debtors to take all actions
necessary on the Debtors, behalf to obtain possession of the Imported
Goods. Additionally, Distributors who (a) move goods to, from and between
the Debtors' various facilities, (b) store and deliver finished products to
the Debtors' customers in and outside the United States, and (c) store such
goods and finished products, as necessary, during the distribution process,
can assert possessory or other liens on supplies and goods currently in
their possession.

The Debtors tell Judge Walrath that the Imported Goods are necessary to
complete orders already placed by customers and point-out that the orders
are worth far more to the Debtors (both in terms of future receipts and the
maintenance of valuable goodwill) than the aggregate amount of accrued, but
unpaid, Import Obligations. If the flow of Imported Goods were to be
interrupted, the result would be a disaster: First, if the prepetition
Distribution Charges are not paid, many Distributors may refuse to perform
additional services for the Debtors. Locating entities to replace the
Distributors will be difficult, if not impossible. At the very least,
replacing a Distributor will delay the transport and delivery of goods to
the Debtors, facilities.

Considering the merits of the Debtors' request, Judge Walrath granted the
Debtors' Motion in all respects. Judge Walrath directs that any Freight
Forwarder or Distributor accepting payment pursuant to her Order must agree
to continue the uninterrupted provision of services on the credit terms as
existed immediately prior to the Petition Date. (Owens-Corning Bankruptcy
News, Issue No. 2; Bankruptcy Creditors' Service, Inc., 609/392-0900)


PACIFICARE HEALTH: President Robert O'Leary Resigns Effective Immediately
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
PacifiCare Health Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: PHSY) announced the resignation of
Robert W. O'Leary, president and chief executive officer, effective
immediately. The Board of Directors appointed Chief Financial Officer
Howard G. Phanstiel to assume the position on an interim basis. Phanstiel
was also named to the Board.

"PacifiCare's short-term and long-term priorities have changed
substantially from what they were perceived to be earlier this year,"
O'Leary said.

"Unfortunately, that change in perception has brought with it my
realization that my skills and background are not a good fit to address the
company's immediate priorities. PacifiCare is a great company, with a
dedicated and talented workforce, and I am proud to say has a very
competent management team in place. I believe that the shareholders
deserve, and the management team needs, a leader well-grounded in the
fundamentals of managed care to lead the company through the time
immediately ahead, in order to position the company to unlock its real
value and future potential."

PacifiCare Chairman David A. Reed commented, "It is with regret that the
Board of Directors accepted Rob O'Leary's resignation. We wish him well.
Well-known to Wall Street, Howard Phanstiel has a background in financial
management, information technology and managed care that makes him well-
suited to guide the company over the months ahead, and he has the full
support of the Board."

Phanstiel, 51, joined the company in July 2000 from ARV Assisted Living,
where he was chairman and chief executive officer. Prior to ARV he gained
his managed care experience as the principal financial officer for
Wellpoint Health Networks, serving as executive vice president of finance
and information services. Previously he was chairman and chief executive
officer of Prudential Bache International Bank, and managing director of
finance at Prudential Securities. Earlier in his career, Phanstiel was
director of the Office of Management and Budget for the U.S. Health Care
Financing Administration.

"I will be working with an outstanding and collaborative team, led by
PacifiCare Health Plans CEO Brad Bowlus and Chief Strategic Officer Bary
Bailey, " Phanstiel said. "I have also been impressed with PacifiCare's
regional health plans and specialty company leadership teams. It will truly
be a collaborative effort as we face the challenge of improving
PacifiCare's current performance and positioning the company to achieve its
future growth potential."

PacifiCare Health Systems is one of the nation's largest health care
services companies. Primary operations include managed care products for
employer groups and Medicare beneficiaries in nine states and Guam serving
approximately four million members. Other specialty products and operations
include behavioral health services, life and health insurance, dental and
vision services, pharmacy benefit management and Medicare+Choice management
services.


SAFETY-KLEEN: Seeks to Pay Superfund Obligations through November 30
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Safety-Kleen and its affiliates are obligated to pay certain prepetition
potentially responsible party obligations under the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1930, as amended,
and comparable state "Superfund" laws. By this Motion, the Debtors sought
and obtained authority to pay certain prepetition potentially responsible
party obligations now due, and (ii) potentially responsible party
obligations that will become due on or before November 30, 2000. The
Debtors, estimate that these Superfund Obligations will consist of
approximately $770,000 of payments now due or that will become due prior to
November 30, 2000. The Debtors, with the consent of their Secured Lenders
and Creditors' Committee, agree to a $1,000,000 cap on these Superfund
Payments.

The Debtors believe that the Superfund Obligations are prepetition claims,
however, if and to the extent the obligations are postpetition obligations,
the Debtors believe that payment would be permitted in the ordinary course
of business, without the necessity of Court approval. The Debtors make it
clear that their Motion is not intended to seek authority to pay
obligations for Superfund sites where payments are not foreseen before
November 30, 2000, or in instances where the Debtors have not reached and
do not foresee reaching an agreement obligating them to make assessment or
other payments on account of Superfund liabilities.

The Debtors tell Judge Walsh that, generally, a Superfun site involves the
identification of potentially responsible parties by a federal or state
agency. In most cases, a PRP is a former owner or operator of a Superfund
site, or a generator, transporter or arranger of waste deposited at a
Superfund site. In most cases, the agencies will serve the PRPs with a
notice or an information request under 42 U.S.C. Sec. 9604(e). Upon
receipt of all responses from the PRPS and the assimilation of information
discovered at the site itself, the agency will typically call a meeting
requiring all of the PRPs to collectively perform an initial site remedial
investigation/feasibility study to better understand what will be required
to clean-up the site. During this initial phaE@;e, the PRPs often perform
an allocation, usually based on volumes of waste each PRP allegedly sent to
the site. All allocation allows for cost responsibility to be divided
appropriately among the PRPs. After what can be several years of
negotiations, public meetings, studies and investigations, the PRP group
generally enters into a consent order with the appropriate government
agency, obligating the PRP group to undertake the site cleanup. From that
point on, the PRP group remediates the site under the oversight of such
agency, The PRP group is required to raise its own money, manage the
remedial project and collectively resolve any issues that may arise along
the way.

The Debtors, and other PRP's are jointly and severally liable for the
various clean-up obligations at respective Superfund sites. As a result of
the S@iperfund process outlined above, the Debtors and other 5 PRP's have
entered into, or anticipate entering into, a number of agreements and/or
administrative orders in connection with the Debtors, participation in
various Superfund remediation site8. The Superfund sites in which the
Debtors have active involvement are:

    Angelillo Site -- Southington, Connecticut
    Bayonne Barrel -- Newark, New Jersey
    Beede Waste Oil -- Plaistow, New Hampshire
    Breslube-Penn -- Corapolis, Pennsylvania
    BROS Site -- Bridgeport, New Jersey
    Cam-Or Site -- Westville, Indiana
    Casmalia Resources -- Santa Barbara County, California
    Combustion, Inc. -- Denham Springs, Louisiana
    Croton Point Landfill -- Croton-on-Hudson, New York
    Divex Site -- Columbia, South Carolina
    Ekotek Superfund -- Salt Lake City, Utah
    N.W. El Monte-Operable Unit -- El Monte, California
    Estes Landfill -- Phoenix, Arizona
    Florida Petroleum Reprocessors (FRP) -- Davie, Florida
    Four County Landfill -- South Bend, Indiana
    Hardage Supefund -- McClain County, Oklahoma
    Helen Kramer Landfill -- Mantau, New Jersey
    J. C. Pennco -- San Antonio, Texas
    Jonas Sewell Transfer Station -- Deptford, New Jersey
    M & J Solvent Company -- Norcross, Georgia
    H & M Drum Sites -- Dartmouth and Freetown, New Hampshire
    Malvern TCE -- Malvern, Pennsylvania
    Marcon Erectors -- Lackawanna, New York
    Northside Sanitary Landfill -- Zionsville, Indiana
    PCB Treatment, Inc. -- Kansas City, Missouri
    Peak Oil Site -- Tampa, Florida
    Petroleum Products -- Pembroke Park, Florida
    RAMP Industries -- Denver, Colorado
    Spectron/Galaxy Site -- Elkton, Maryland
    Solvent Recovery Services of New England -- Southington, Connecticut
    Sydney Mines -- Brandon, Florida
    Third Site Enviro-Chem -- Zionsville, Indianna
    Union Chemical -- Southhope, Maine
    Western Processing -- Kent, Washington
    Wichita (North Industrial Corridor) -- Wichita, Kansas
    Port of Redwood City Site -- Redwood City, California

Safety-Kleen's lawyers express the Debtors' grave concern about the impact
on their businesses if the Debtors are not permitted to pay the Superfund
obligations and meet their apportioned responsibilities to the PRP groups,
thereby resulting in other PRP's having to pay or otherwise be Responsible
for the Debtors' share of the Superfund obligations. As a result of these
concerns, the Debtors' believe that it is in the best interests of the
Debtors' estates, their creditors and other parties in interest for the
Debtors' to pay the Superfund obligations in the ordinary course as they
come due.

Many reasons, David S. Kurtz, Esq., of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher &
Flom, argues, exist for authorizing the Debtors to pay the Superfund
Obligations. Chief among those reasons -- and perhaps most compelling --
is the simple fact that absent payment of the Superfund obligations in the
ordinary course of business, there is a substantial likelihood that the
Debtors, businesses will be damaged beyond repair, severely jeopardizing
the Debtors' chances for a successful reorganization.

Mr. Kurtz reminds Judge Walsh of his previous statements to the Court that
the Debtors have no intention of using their bankruptcy filings as a tool
to avoid paying the Superfund Obligations, as this would be inherently
contrary to the Debtors' overall business philosophy. In fact, as
explicitly stated at the hearing before the Court on June 13, 2000, "it is
not the [Debtors'] intention in this bankruptcy proceeding to walk away
from or discharge any of its environmental commitments or obligations under
environmental laws." Hearing Transcript, June 13, 2000 at p. 5. Moreover,
even if the Debtors' wanted to walk away from the Superfund Obligations,
the Debtors believe that such actions would send a message throughout the
industry, from generators of hazardous waste to competitors who dispose of
such waste, that the Debtors have not and will not take responsibility for
their environmental obligations. This would negatively impact on their
relationships with other PRPs, their customers, potential customers and
regulatory agencies.

In connection with active Superfund sites where the Debtors have ongoing
financial, legal or technical obligations, the Debtors have working
relationships with the other PRPs to remediate such sites. These working
relationships typically resulted from years of negotiating with the federal
and state regulators and the other PRPs. At a site where the Debtors are a
major PRP, any disruption in the Debtors' involvement would have
significant repercussions among the PRP group and would likely result in
the Debtors, inability to continue those relationships going forward. In
many cases, the loss of even one PRP in a PRP group at a Superfund site can
have a detrimental effect on the entire PRP group, especially if that lost
PRP had a significant percentage of the allocation. The trust and
cooperation that have been a crucial part of the formation of the PRP
groups will be jeopardized if the Debtors fail to comply with their
Superfund obligations. (Safety-Kleen Bankruptcy News, Issue No. 8;
Bankruptcy Creditors' Service, Inc., 609/392-0900)


SERVICE MERCHANDISE: Winding-Up Non-Debtor Insurance Subsidiary
---------------------------------------------------------------
At the Debtors' behest, Judge Paine authorized Service Merchandise Corp.,
pursuant to 11 U.S.C. sections 105 and 363(b), to wind up and dissolve
Service Merchandise's wholly-owned, non-debtor subsidiary, Ser Plus
Assurance Company, a Class II insurance company incorporated in mid-1998
under the laws of Bermuda.

The main reason for this determination, the Debtors tell Judge Paine, is
that Ser Plus is not being used, and is not expected to be used, to its
full potential due to changes in Service Merchandise's expectations with
respect to the utility of, and the costs and benefits associated with Ser
Plus. As a result, Ser Plus generates limited economic benefit and does not
form a part of the Debtor's core business. Considering these factors and
the continuing expense and distraction associated with managing and
operating an offshore insurance company, the Debtors have concluded that it
is prudent to suspend this insurance business for the time being.

At the time of its incorporation, it was contemplated that Ser Plus would
insure the Debtors against three types of risk associated with Service
Merchandise's business:

    (a) the self-insured retention or deductible amounts under Service
         Merchardise's General Liability Insurance policies;

    (b) the self-insured retention or deductible amounts under Service
         Merchandise's Workers' Compensation Insurance policies; and

    (c) a portion of the risk associated with the policies insuring Service
         Merchandise Warranties.

Ser Plus realized income through the insurance premiums paid by Service
Merchandise, generated interest income on reserves required by Bermuda law,
and also benefited Service Merchandise with certain tax advantages from
transactions.

However, as a result of certain Commutation Transaction in May 1999 as part
of Service Merchandise's review of its insurance and cash needs, Ser Plus's
business relates only to the Warranty Insurance.

While Ser Plus's original business plan called for the generation of annual
premiums in the amount of almost $20 million in 2000, the current
operations generate only a small percentage of that amount because
approximately half of the anticipated premiums related to General Liability
Insurance and Workers' Compensation Insurance and would not be realized
subsequent to the change in operation due to the Commutation Transaction,
and another $5 million in premiums were originally expected from a
projected expansion of third party insurance business but that did not
occur.

Nonetheless, Ser Plus still incurs many of the same expenses such as local
fees associated with its Class II insurance license, fees and expenses of
its local managers, including AON Insurance Managers (Bermuda) Ltd., fees
and expenses for required auditors, Deloitte & Touche (Bermuda) Ltd., fees
and expenses for counsel, fees and expenses for actuaries required under
Bermuda law, and expenses incurred by Service Merchandise's representatives
for meetings and other necessary corporate functions in Bermuda.

In their business judgment, the Debtors have determined that it is in the
best interests of the Debtors' estates to wind down the operations of Ser
Plus and exit the insurance business, at least for the foreseeable future.
Accordingly, the Debtors request:

    (A) authority to take all steps necessary to wind down and dissolve Ser
         Plus, and

    (B) approval of the Commutation Transaction, including, but not limited
         to:

        (1) Issuance of a letter of instruction to Ser Plus to wind down its
             operations and cease writing reinsurance;

        (2) Engagement of professionals necessary to prepare and issue
             audited financial statements, and make such filings as required
             by Bermuda law;

        (3) Ratification of any transactions as required by Bermuda law in
             connection with the dissolution;

        (4) Issuing a letter of indemnity to the Monitor appointed under
             Bermuda law to wind up the affairs of Ser Plus and to the
             directors of Ser Plus who will be assisting the Monitor;

        (5) Engagement of professionals in connection with any necessary
             approvals for the dissolution of Ser Plus;

        (6) Disposal of assets and satisfying debts of Ser Plus; and

        (7) Termination or otherwise resolving any remaining contracts on
             which Ser Plus owes performance.
(Service Merchandise Bankruptcy News, Issue No. 13; Bankruptcy Creditors'
Service, Inc., 609/392-0900)


SILVER CINEMAS: Fed Up, Committee Moves for Conversion or Dismissal
-------------------------------------------------------------------
The Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors of Silver Cinemas
International, Inc., tells Judge Farnan that its time for the curtain to
fall in this theater chain's chapter 11 case.  Silver Cinemas has no cash
in the bank, can borrow no more than $26,000 under its debtor-in-possession
financing facility, the DIP Lenders say that the DIP Financing Agreement is
in default, and administrative priority claims are swelling as the Company
is unable to perform post-petition obligations under assumed construction
contracts.  These facts, the Committee argues, make it impossible for the
Debtors to propose a confirmable plan of reorganization.  Accordingly, the
Debtors' chapter 11 cases should be converted to a chapter 7 liquidation or
the cases should be dismissed.

Robert Jay Moore, Esq., and David B. Zolkin, Esq., of Milbank, Tweed,
Hadley & McCloy LLP, lead counsel to the Committee remind Judge Farnan
that, at the outset of these chapter 11 cases, the Debtors made it very
clear that "[a] crucial component of the Debtors' long term viability and
success" was the successful financing and completion of the build-out of
five new, state of the art movie theatres located in key cities throughout
the country.  Silver Cinemas represented that once completed, the New
Theatres would add between approximately $26 million and $35 million in
enterprise value to the Debtors' estates.  On the basis of these and other
representations, early in these Cases the Committee consented to and the
Bankruptcy Court approved:  

      (a) a $50 million debtor in possession financing facility, including a
          $17 million construction loan component to fund the New Build
          Program;

      (b) the repayment in full of the Debtors' pre-petition loan facility,
          which also included a construction loan component; and

      (c) the Debtors post-petition assumption or execution of numerous
          leases and construction and other contracts associated with the
          New Theatres.

Now, ironically, the DIP Lenders declare that the very financing that was
so critical to the success of the New Build Program and to the estates'
ability to reorganize have rendered the estates virtually incapable of
reorganizing.  

Committee Chair Oaktree Capital Management, LLC, as general partner and/or
investment manager of certain funds and accounts it manages, a holder of an
unsecured claim against the estate in excess of $60 million, presented a
term sheet dated earlier this month for a new DIP construction loan
facility underwritten by Oaktree and a related chapter 11 plan.  Oaktree's
Construction Loan Proposal provided that, rather than requiring the
Construction Loan to be repaid (as required under the DIP Loan) or rolled
over into exit financing upon confirmation of a plan of reorganization, the
outstanding balance under the proposed facility would have converted to a
controlling equity interest in the reorganized Debtors.  The DIP Lenders
refused even to enter into negotiations with the Committee regarding the
Construction Loan Proposal unless Oaktree, its proponent, would also agree
to fund ongoing working capital needs of the Debtors during the negotiation
and confirmation process, funding that would be required of the DIP Lenders
in the context of a chapter 11 sale process in any event!  The Committee
doesn't fault Oaktree for declining to provide piecemeal financing without
any game plan in place.

Absent fruitful out-of-court negotiations to resolve the business issues
underpinning the Committee's Motion, Judge Farnan will entertain the
Committee's arguments at high-noon hearing on November 9 in Wilmington.  


TOKHEIM CORPORATION: Chapter 11 Plan Declared Effective on October 20
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Tokheim Corporation (OTCBB:TOKM) announced that it has completed its
financial restructuring plan, effective October 20, 2000. The Company also
announced results for the three and nine months ended August 31, 2000
reflecting business trends consistent with those experienced in the
Company's fiscal first half ended May 31, 2000.

On October 4, 2000, the Company's previously announced prepackaged
financial restructuring plan under Chapter 11 (the "Plan") was confirmed by
the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, only 38
days after Tokheim filed its Plan with the Court. The Plan became effective
as of October 20, 2000.

The Company also announced that the Common Stock of the reorganized company
has been issued to its bondholders and certain other creditors under the
terms of the Plan. The new Common Stock's trading symbol is expected to be
assigned shortly. The Company's previously issued Common Stock, which had
been trading under the symbol "TOKM" on the OTC Bulletin Board, has ceased
trading and has been cancelled pursuant to the Plan. Information regarding
the exchange of old Common Stock for warrants to purchase new Common Stock,
pursuant to the Plan, will be sent to holders of old Common Stock shortly.
Douglas K. Pinner, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, stated:

    "Our ability to achieve confirmation of our prepackaged financial
    restructuring Plan in only 38 days is a testament to the underlying
    strengths of the Company and is also largely attributable to the
    developed knowledge and understanding of our business by our lenders,
    the dedication of our management team, and the support of our employees,
    vendors, and customers. "While a difficult process, this reorganization
    has enabled us to effectively move past a number of challenges and
    establish a strong foundation for solid performance and growth.

    "Going forward, we intend to continue to build Tokheim's position as the
    global leader in the industry, bringing continued leadership in
    technology, quality focus and customer service. We are very excited
    about the future of our business."

Consolidated sales for the fiscal 2000 third quarter were $122.7 million
compared to $169.2 million in the comparable quarter a year ago.
Consolidated sales for the nine month period ended August 31, 2000 were
$389.9 million compared to $512.4 million in the comparable 1999 nine month
period. The impact of exchange rate fluctuations, especially the weakening
of the Euro, was a decrease in sales for the three and nine month periods
ended August 31, 2000 of 9.3% and 7.7%, respectively.

On August 11, 2000, the Company settled out of court for $7 million, a
claim made by the former shareholders of MSI. This award has been accrued
for in the third quarter and classified as a "liability subject to
compromise" in the consolidated condensed balance sheet. These claimants
will receive common stock in the newly reorganized company.

For the three months ended August 31, 2000, the loss applicable to common
stock was $30.6 million or $2.41 per diluted common share compared to a
loss applicable to common stock of $5.8 million or $0.46 per diluted common
share for the same period in 1999. For the nine month period ended August
31, 2000, the loss applicable to common stock was $69.2 million or $5.46
per diluted common share compared to a loss applicable to common stock of
$32.0 million or $2.52 per diluted common share for the comparable 1999
period.

Tokheim, based in Fort Wayne, Indiana is the world's largest producer of
petroleum dispensing devices. Tokheim Corporation manufactures and services
electronic and mechanical petroleum dispensing systems. These systems
include petroleum dispensers and pumps, retail automation systems (such as
point-of-sale systems), dispenser payment or "pay-at-the-pump" terminals,
replacement parts, and upgrade kits.


TRI VALLEY: Several Prospective Buyers for Bankrupt Tomato Grower
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Terry Brennan of TheDailyDeal.com reports that Tri Valley Growers is
placing its assets up for sale.  Del Monte, Conagra, Chiquita Brands, and
Seneca are the most likely buyers of the bankrupt co-op's assets. According
to a recent company statement, Tri Valley is engaged in serious talks with
other prospective buyers too.  The fruit and tomato cooperative hired
Goldsmith-Agio-Helms of Minneapolis to handle disposition of the assets.
"There have been quite a few companies that have come forward and we think
it could turn into an auction process," said spokeswoman Maya Pagoda of
Sitrick and Co., a Los Angeles public relations firm hired to handle Tri
Valley's bankruptcy.

Tri Valley Growers, considered the nation's largest canned fruit and tomato
processors, filed for Chapter 11. The petition was filed in the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of California in Oakland.


VENCOR, INC: Delaware Court Extends DIP Financing Until January 31, 2000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vencor, Inc. announced that the United States Bankruptcy Court for the
District of Delaware approved an amendment to the Company's debtor-in-
possession financing to extend its maturity until January 31, 2001. The
Amendment also revises and updates certain financial covenants. In
addition, the Amendment extends through November 22, 2000 the period of
time for the Company to file the appropriate pleadings to request
confirmation and consummation of its plan of reorganization.

The DIP Financing and existing cash flows will be used to fund the
Company's operations during its restructuring. As of October 25, 2000, the
Company had no outstanding borrowings under the DIP Financing.

The Court also approved an amendment to the previously announced commitment
letter among the Company and certain of the DIP lenders to extend the date
by which Court approval must be obtained for the Commitment Letter to be
effective through January 31, 2001. Pursuant to the Commitment Letter,
certain of the DIP lenders would finance an amended and restated debtor-in-
possession credit agreement that would become effective in the event the
Company became involved in legal proceedings against Ventas, Inc. (NYSE:
VTR). The amendment to the Commitment Letter also extends to January 31,
2001 the date by which litigation would need to be commenced with Ventas.
The consummation of the Restated DIP also would be subject to other
customary conditions contained in the Commitment Letter.

On September 29, 2000, the Company filed its proposed plan of
reorganization with the Court. At this time, the Company has adjourned the
hearing seeking approval of the Commitment Letter and the Restated DIP in
light of the status of the current negotiations with its major
constituencies to finalize the terms of its proposed plan of
reorganization.

Vencor and its subsidiaries filed voluntary petitions for reorganization
under Chapter 11 with the Court on September 13, 1999.
Vencor, Inc. is a national provider of long-term healthcare services
primarily operating nursing centers and hospitals.


WASTE MANAGEMENT: Announces Investment Conferences for Fourth Quarter
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Waste Management Inc. (NYSE:WMI) announced that executives of the
Company currently plan on attending and presenting at the following
investment conferences during the fourth quarter 2000:

    October 27th First Analysis European Conference
    November 15th 2000 Chase Bond Conference
    November 30th Deutsche Bank Alex Brown Basis Industries Conference

Although these presentations are not expected to include any material
non-public information, the Company will post the presentation slides on
its Web site. The slides will be posted some time during the 24-hour period
prior to the scheduled presentation time. The slides may be accessed via
the Investor Relations section of the Company's corporate Web site, which
is located at www.wm.com.

Waste Management Inc. is its industry's leading provider of comprehensive
waste management services. Based in Houston, the Company serves municipal,
commercial, industrial and residential customers throughout North America.


* BOOK REVIEW: The Failure of the Franklin National Bank:
                Challenge to the International Banking System
------------------------------------------------------------
Author: Joan E. Spero
Publisher: Beard Books
Softcover: 235 Pages
List Price: $34.95
Order a copy today from Amazon.com at
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1893122344/internetbankrupt

Review by Susan Pannell

In 1974 the international financial system faced its most serious crisis
since the 1930s. The stresses and shocks of that year, including the
failure of the Franklin National Bank, led to a crisis of confidence that
brought the international banking system dangerously close to disaster.
Franklin's failure forced United States and foreign regulatory authorities
to devise new ways to avert an international banking crisis, and served as
a catalyst for later efforts to bring international banking under public
management.

The author's case study, first published in 1979 when events were very
fresh, examines the failure of the Franklin--once the twentieth largest
bank in the United States within the context of the banking crisis.
Franklin's collapse was both cause and effect: changes in banking
regulation and practice contributed to the bank's problems, while its
collapse forced bank regulators and policymakers to address the new
international nature of banking and to cooperate in addressing dramatic
changes in international financial markets, and, hopefully, avoiding a
repeat of the crisis.

The book begins by reviewing the economic and political factors that led to
the internationalization of American banks as many banks became
multinational corporations. This phenomenon surged during the 1960s and
1970s, carrying the Franklin (which even acquired a foreign owner, Italian
financier Michele Sindona) with it. The work then examines the extent to
which the Franklin's demise was cause by its international activities and,
in turn, the manner in which Franklin's insolvency threatened the
international banking system.

After analyzing the crisis's antecedents, the book moves to a discussion of
United States regulatory responses to control it, and explains how American
authorities were forced to take innovative steps to manage the
international dimensions of the Franklin crisis. Those steps included a
massive Federal Reserve loan and the use of that loan to cover foreign
branch outflows, assistance in managing foreign exchange operations and the
eventual purchase of Franklin's foreign exchange book, and the FDIC sale.

Not even those bold regulatory approaches sufficed to stem the crisis,
however, United states regulators were obliged to seek assistance from
other nations' financial authorities. The cooperative approach not only
prevented the crisis from devolving into a crash, but also laid the
groundwork for increased cooperation in the future. This achievement, the
author concludes, was the lasting (and beneficial) effect of the failure of
the Franklin National Bank.

The Franklin episode, thus, revealed both the weaknesses and the strengths
of the United States' regulatory system as it applies to international
banking.

Joan E. Spero is president of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. She
served as Undersecretary of State for Economic, Business, and Agricultural
Affairs from 1993 to 1997, and taught for several years at Columbia
University. She is a member of the Council of American Ambassadors.



                                *********


Bond pricing, appearing in each Monday's edition of the TCR, is provided by
DLS Capital Partners in Dallas, Texas.

A list of Meetings, Conferences and Seminars appears in each Wednesday's
edition of the TCR. Submissions about insolvency-related conferences are
encouraged. Send announcements to conferences@bankrupt.com.

Each Friday's edition of the TCR includes a review about a book of interest
to troubled company professionals. All titles available from Amazon.com --
go to http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/189312214X/internetbankrupt--  
or through your local bookstore.

For copies of court documents filed in the District of Delaware, please
contact Vito at Parcels, Inc., at 302-658-9911. For bankruptcy documents
filed in cases pending outside the District of Delaware, contact Ken Troubh
at Nationwide Research & Consulting at 207/791-2852.


                               *********

S U B S C R I P T I O N   I N F O R M A T I O N

Troubled Company Reporter is a daily newsletter, co-published by Bankruptcy
Creditors' Service, Inc., Trenton, NJ, and Beard Group, Inc., Washington,
DC. Debra Brennan, Yvonne L. Metzler, Ronald Ladia, Zenar Andal, and Grace
Samson, Editors.

Copyright 2000. All rights reserved. ISSN 1520-9474.

This material is copyrighted and any commercial use, resale or publication
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